Archive for May, 2007

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe (BNSF) – a photoset on Flickr

Thursday, May 31st, 2007

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe (BNSF) – a photoset on Flickr

Wow, these are excellent. There’s even a recent shot of a BNSF locomotive in the getting-rarer-by-the-day green and white BN livery.

Nitrozac Portraits!

Thursday, May 31st, 2007

Nitrozac Portraits!

I am 93% sure I am getting these for the whole family. This is almost as good as getting a WSJ-style hedcut portrait.

Law Merchant – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thursday, May 31st, 2007

Law Merchant – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Just in case you thought law must be provided by a monopoly (i.e. government):

The Law Merchant is a legal system used by merchants in medieval Europe, including England. Rather than being the result of the edict of a final authority, it was evolved based on common usage.

Saving Power with Linux on Intel Hardware

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007

Saving Power with Linux on Intel Hardware
<blockquote>PowerTOP is a Linux tool that finds the software component(s) that make your laptop use more power than necessary while it is idle.</blockquote>

HowTo Use a Cingular LG CU500 as a BlueTooth Modem with Fedora Core 5 (FC5) on a ThinkPad T41p

Friday, May 18th, 2007

HowTo Use a Cingular LG CU500 as a BlueTooth Modem with Fedora Core 5 (FC5) on a ThinkPad T41p

A few typos, but more than enough to get me up and running using my Nokia N75. UMTS seems somewhat faster than EDGE, but it’s not the huge bump I was expecting considering this is now considered “real” 3G and EDGE is only 2.5G.

fring – Mobile VoIP application for cellular handsets

Thursday, May 10th, 2007

fring – Mobile VoIP application for cellular handsets

fring is a VOIP application for cell phones, which seems kinda weird, but makes sense because it works with skype, gtalk, and a couple of other things. I was mostly interested in this as a client for gtalk instant messaging, but the app not very good for this purpose. If you’re typing when an instant message comes in, what you’re typing gets erased, and it doesn’t make full use of the S60 predictive text (it won’t let you spell a word it doesn’t know yet, and you can’t see what mode you’re currently typing in, you just kinda figure it out as you go).

Vox Knowledge Base: Using Vox Mobile

Thursday, May 10th, 2007

Vox Knowledge Base: Using Vox Mobile

I just got a new Nokia N75. It’s a nice upgrade from the previous 6682, but not all of the apps I was using on the old phone work with Series 60 v3 yet. In particular, zonetag does not work. Vox has a S60 app that is similar, but it’s not quite as good. It takes a few more steps to actually get pictures to the website (with zonetag you just take the pic and push the right softkey two times and you’re done) and the app seems to poop out without reason every once in a while.

EPEL – Fedora Project Wiki

Thursday, May 10th, 2007

EPEL – Fedora Project Wiki

EPEL is a volunteer-based community effort from the Fedora project to create a repository of high-quality add-on packages that complement the Fedora-based Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and its compatible spinoffs like CentOS or Scientific Linux.

Enterprise Linux Log » AMD will deliver open graphics drivers

Thursday, May 10th, 2007

Enterprise Linux Log » AMD will deliver open graphics drivers

It’s not clear to me whether AMD will be delivering actual code or just providing complete documentation. Either way, this is a welcome change from previous ATI policy.

Red Hat News | Liberation Fonts

Thursday, May 10th, 2007

Red Hat News | Liberation Fonts

In the article I wrote for the On The Docket column in the March 2007 issue of Linux Magazine, I discussed various legal issues that are impeding the adoption of Linux on the desktop. One of those issues is the ubiquity of the proprietary Microsoft fonts – Times New Roman®, Arial® and Courier New®. Use of these proprietary fonts presents a barrier to truly open documents in that Microsoft will not license others to redistribute these fonts. In that same article, I also suggested that this problem was solvable by the development of a set of fonts that are the metric equivalents of the Microsoft fonts, i.e., the fonts assume the identical horizontal spacing as the Microsoft fonts such that, when substituted for the Microsoft fonts, a line of text is identically displayed. To date the Linux desktop has not had access to such metrically equivalent fonts under an open source license. Today, that changes.